Visiting? What to expect:

The first week visit (3 to 5 days old)


What to Expect During This Visit The doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your baby's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address any concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is:

  • Feeding. Newborns should be fed whenever they seem hungry. Breastfed infants eat about every 1–3 hours, and formula-fed infants eat about every 2–4 hours. Your doctor or nurse can watch as you breastfeed and offer help with any problems. Burp your baby midway through a feeding and again at the end.
  • Peeing and pooping. Newborns should have about six wet diapers a day. The number of poopy diapers varies, but most newborns have 3 or 4 soft bowel movements a day. Tell your doctor if you have any concerns about your newborn's bowel movements.
  • Sleeping. A newborn may sleep up to 18 or 19 hours a day, waking up often (day and night) to breastfeed or take a bottle. Breastfed babies usually wake to eat every 1–3 hours, while formula-fed babies may sleep longer, waking every 2–4 hours to eat (formula takes longer to digest so babies feel fuller longer). Newborns should not sleep more than 4 hours between feedings until they have good weight gain, usually within the first few weeks. After that, it's OK if a baby sleeps for longer stretches.
  • Developing. In the first month, babies should:
  • pay attention to faces or bright objects 8–12 inches (20–30 cm) away
  • respond to sound — they may quiet down, blink, turn head, startle, or cry
  • hold arms and legs in a flexed position
  • move arms and legs equally
  • lift head briefly when on stomach (babies should only be placed on the stomach while awake and under supervision)
  • have strong newborn reflexes, such as:

  • rooting and sucking: turns toward, then sucks breast/bottle nipple
  • grasp: tightly grabs hold of a finger placed within the palm
  • fencer's pose: straightens arm when head is turned to that side and bends opposite arm
  • Moro reflex (startle response): throws out arms and legs, then curls them in when startled
3. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed with you present. This exam will include an eye exam, listening to your baby's heart and feeling pulses, inspecting the umbilical cord, and checking the hips. 4. Do screening tests. Your doctor will review the screening tests from the hospital and repeat tests, if needed. If a hearing test wasn't done then, your baby will have one now. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect infants from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your baby get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your next routine visit at 1 month: Feeding
  • Continue to feed your baby when he or she is hungry. Pay attention to signs that your baby is full, such as turning away from the nipple or bottle and closing the mouth.
  • Don't give solid foods or juice.
  • Don't put cereal in your baby's bottle unless directed to by your doctor.

If you breastfeed:

  • Help your baby latch on correctly: mouth opened wide, tongue down, with as much breast in the mouth as possible.
  • Continue to take a prenatal vitamin or multivitamin daily.
  • Ask your doctor about vitamin D drops for your baby.
  • Don't use a bottle or pacifier until nursing is well established (usually about 1 month).

If you formula-feed:

  • Give your baby iron-fortified formula.
  • Follow the formula package's instructions when making and storing bottles.
  • Don't prop bottles or put your baby to bed with a bottle.
  • Talk to your doctor before switching formulas.
Routine Care
  • Wash your hands before handling the baby and avoid people who may be sick.
  • Keep the diaper below the umbilical cord so the stump can dry. The umbilical cord usually falls off in 10–14 days.
  • For circumcised boys, put petroleum jelly on the penis or diaper's front.
  • Give sponge baths until the umbilical cord falls off and a boy's circumcision heals. Make sure the water isn't too hot — test it with your wrist first.
  • Use fragrance-free soaps and lotions.
  • Hold your baby and be attentive to his or her needs. You can't spoil a newborn.
  • Sing, talk, and read to your baby. Babies learn best by interacting with people.
  • It's normal for infants to have fussy periods, but for some, crying can be excessive, lasting several hours a day. If a baby develops colic, it usually starts in an otherwise well baby around 3 weeks of age.
  • Call your baby's doctor if your infant has a fever or is acting sick, isn't eating, isn't peeing, or isn't pooping. Don't give medicine to an infant younger than 2 months old without talking to your doctor first.
  • It's common for new moms to feel tired and overwhelmed at times. But if these feelings are intense, or you feel sad, moody, or anxious, call your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
Safety
  1. To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS):

  • Breastfeed your baby.
  • Let your baby sleep in your room in a bassinet or crib next to the bed until your baby's first birthday or for at least 6 months, when the risk of SIDS is highest.
  • Always place your baby to sleep on a firm mattress on his or her back in a crib or bassinet without any crib bumpers, blankets, quilts, pillows, or plush toys.
  • Avoid overheating by keeping the room temperature comfortable.
  • Don't overbundle your baby.
  • Consider putting your baby to sleep sucking on a pacifier. If you're breastfeeding, wait until breastfeeding is established before introducing the pacifier.
  1. Don't smoke or use e-cigarettes. Don't let anyone else smoke or vape around your baby.
  2. Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat. Never leave your baby alone in a car.
  3. While your baby is awake, don't leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath.
  4. Never shake your baby — it can cause bleeding in the brain and even death.
  5. Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. Sunscreens are not recommended for infants younger than 6 months. However, you may use a small amount of sunscreen on an infant younger than 6 months if shade and clothing don't offer enough protection.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




1 month old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your baby's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address any concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is:

  • Feeding. Infants should be fed when they seem hungry. At this age, breastfed babies will eat about eight to twelve times in a 24-hour period. Formula-fed infants consume about 24 ounces a day. Burp your baby midway through feedings and at the end.
  • Peeing and pooping. Infants should have about six wet diapers a day. The number of poopy diapers varies, but most breastfed babies will have three or more. Around 6 weeks of age, breastfed babies may go several days without a bowel movement. Formula-fed babies have at least one bowel movement a day. Tell your doctor if you have any concerns about your infant's bowel movements.
  • Sleeping. Infants this age sleep about 14 to 17 hours a day, including 4 or 5 daytime naps. Breastfed babies may still wake often to eat at night, while bottle-fed infants may sleep for longer stretches.
Developing. By 1 month of age, babies should:
  • focus and follow objects (especially faces)
  • respond to sound by quieting down, blinking, turning the head, startling, or crying
  • still hold arms and legs in a flexed position, but start to extend legs more frequently
  • move arms and legs equally
  • lift the head briefly when on the stomach
  • have strong newborn reflexes:

  • rooting and sucking: turns toward, then sucks breast/bottle nipple
  • grasp: tightly grabs hold of a finger placed within the palm
  • fencer's pose: straightens arm when head is turned to that side and bends opposite arm
  • Moro reflex (startle response): throws out arms and legs and then curls them in when startled
3. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, listening to your baby's heart and feeling pulses, examining the belly, and checking the hips. 4. Do screening tests. Your doctor will review the screening tests from the hospital and repeat tests, if needed. If a hearing test wasn't done then, your baby will have one now. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect infants from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your baby get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your baby's next routine checkup at 2 months: Feeding
  • Continue to feed your baby when he or she is hungry. Pay attention to signs that your baby is full, such as turning away from the breast or nipple and closing the mouth. Between 6 and 8 weeks, your baby may be hungrier due to a growth spurt.
  • Don't give solid foods or or juice.
  • Don't put cereal in your baby's bottle unless directed to by your doctor.
  • Continue to burp your baby midway through and at the end of feedings.

If you breastfeed:

  • If you haven't yet, you can now pump and store breast milk for future use.
  • If breastfeeding is well established, it's OK to introduce a bottle or pacifier. You might need to have someone else offer the bottle if your little one rejects it when you try.
  • Continue to take a prenatal vitamin or multivitamin daily.
  • Ask your doctor about vitamin D drops for the baby.

If you formula-feed:

  • Give your baby iron-fortified formula.
  • Follow the formula package's instructions when making and storing bottles.
  • Don't prop bottles or put your baby to bed with a bottle.
  • Talk to your doctor before switching formulas.
Routine Care
  • Wash your hands before handling the baby and avoid people who may be sick.
  • Hold your baby and be attentive to his or her needs. You can't spoil a baby.
  • Sing, talk, and read to your baby. Babies learn best by interacting with people.
  • Give your baby supervised "tummy time" when awake. Always supervise your baby and be ready to help if he or she gets tired or frustrated in this position.
  • It's normal for infants to have fussy periods, but for some, crying can be excessive, lasting several hours a day. If a baby develops colic, it usually starts in an otherwise well baby at around 3 weeks, peaks around 6 weeks, and improves by 3 months.
  • Call your doctor if your baby has a fever or is acting sick. Don't give medicine to an infant younger than 2 months old without talking to your doctor first.
  • It's common for new moms to feel tired and overwhelmed at times. But if these feelings are intense, or you feel sad, moody, or anxious, call your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
Safety
  1. To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS):

  • Let your baby sleep in your room in a bassinet or crib next to the bed until your baby's first birthday or for at least 6 months, when the risk of SIDS is highest.
  • Always place your baby to sleep on a firm mattress on his or her back in a crib or bassinet without any crib bumpers, blankets, quilts, pillows, or plush toys.
  • Avoid overheating by keeping the room temperature comfortable.
  • Don't overbundle your baby.
  • Consider putting your baby to sleep sucking on a pacifier.
  1. Don't smoke or use e-cigarettes. Don't let anyone smoke or vape around your baby.
  2. Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the backseat. Never leave your baby alone in the car.
  3. Keep all cords, wires, and toys with loops or strings away from your baby.
  4. While your baby is awake, don't leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath.
  5. Never shake your baby — it can cause bleeding in the brain and even death.
  6. Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. Sunscreens are not recommended for infants younger than 6 months. However, you may use a small amount of sunscreen on an infant younger than 6 months if shade and clothing don't offer enough protection.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




2 month old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your baby's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is:

  • Feeding. Your baby might be going longer between feedings now, but will still have times when he or she wants to eat more. Most babies this age breastfeed about eight times in a 24-hour period or drink about 26–28 ounces (780–840 ml) of formula a day.
  • Peeing and pooping. Babies should have several wet diapers a day and tend to have fewer poopy diapers. Breastfed babies' stools should be soft and may be slightly runny. Formula-fed babies' stools tend to be a little firmer, but should not be hard.
  • Sleeping. Your baby will probably begin to stay awake for longer periods and be more alert during the day, sleeping more at night. Breastfed babies may have a 4- to 5-hour stretch at night, and formula fed babies may go 5 to 6 hours between feedings. Waking up at night to be fed is normal.
  • Developing. By 2 months, it's common for many babies to:
    • focus and track faces and objects from one side to the other
    • be alert to sounds
    • recognize parents' faces and voices
    • gurgle and coo (say "ooh" and "ah")
    • smile in response to being talked to, played with, or smiled at
    • lift their head up while lying on their belly
    • grasp a rattle placed within the hand
  • There's a wide range of normal, and children develop at different rates. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your child's development.
3. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, listening to your baby's heart and feeling pulses, checking hips, and paying attention to your baby's movements. 4. Do screening tests. Your doctor will review the screening tests from the hospital and repeat tests, if needed. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect infants from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your baby receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your baby's next routine checkup at 4 months: Feeding

If you breastfeed:

  • If possible, breastfeed exclusively (no formula, other fluids, or solids) for 6 months. If desired, pumped breast milk may be given in a bottle.
  • If you plan to go back to work soon, introduce the bottle now to get your baby used to bottle-feeding.
  • Ask your doctor about vitamin D drops for your baby.
  • Continue to take a daily prenatal vitamin or multivitamin.
  • Do not introduce solids (including infant cereal) or juice. Breast milk or formula is still all your baby needs.
  • Pay attention to signs that your baby is hungry or full.
If formula-feeding, give iron-fortified formula.
  • If your baby takes a bottle of breast milk or formula:

  • Do not prop your baby's bottle.
  • Do not put your baby to bed with a bottle.
Routine Care
  • Wash your hands before handling the baby and avoid people who may be sick.
  • Hold your baby and be attentive to his or her needs. You can't spoil a baby.
  • Sing, talk, and read to your baby. Babies learn best by interacting with people.
  • Give your baby supervised "tummy time" when awake. Always supervise your baby and be ready to help if he or she gets tired or frustrated in this position.
  • Limit the amount of time your baby spends in an infant seat, bouncer, or swing.
  • It's normal for infants to have fussy periods, but for some, crying can be excessive, lasting several hours a day. If a baby develops colic, it usually starts in an otherwise well baby at around 3 weeks, peaks around 6 weeks, and improves by 3 months.
  • It's common for new moms to feel tired and overwhelmed at times. But if these feelings are intense, or you feel sad, moody, or anxious, call your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
Safety
  1. To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS):

  • Let your baby sleep in your room in a bassinet or crib next to the bed until your baby's first birthday or for at least 6 months, when the risk of SIDS is highest.
  • Always place your baby to sleep on a firm mattress on his or her back in a crib or bassinet without any crib bumpers, blankets, quilts, pillows, or plush toys.
  • Avoid overheating by keeping the room temperature comfortable.
  • Don't overbundle your baby.
  • Consider putting your baby to sleep sucking on a pacifier.
  1. Don't use an infant walker. They're dangerous and can cause serious injuries. Walkers also do not encourage walking and may actually hinder it.
  2. Soon, your baby will be reaching, grasping, and moving things to his or her mouth, so keep small objects and harmful substances out of reach. Keep your baby away from cords, wires, and toys with loops or strings.
  3. While your baby is awake, don't leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath.
  4. Never shake your baby — it can cause bleeding in the brain and even death.
  5. Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat. Never leave your baby alone in the car.
  6. Don't smoke or use e-cigarettes. Don't let anyone else smoke or vape around your baby.
  7. Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. Sunscreens are not recommended for infants younger than 6 months. However, you may use a small amount of sunscreen on an infant younger than 6 months if shade and clothing don't offer enough protection.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




4 months old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your baby's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is:

  • Feeding. Breast milk or formula is still all your baby needs. Iron-fortified cereal or puréed meats can be introduced when your baby is ready for solid foods at about 6 months of age. Talk with your doctor before starting any solids.
  • Peeing and pooping. Babies this age should have several wet diapers a day and regular bowel movements. Some may poop every day; others may poop every few days. This is normal as long as stools are soft. Let your doctor know if they become hard, dry, or difficult to pass.
  • Sleeping. At this age, babies sleep about 12 to 16 hours a day, with two or three daytime naps. Most babies have a stretch of sleep for 5 or 6 hours at night. Some infants, particularly those who are breastfed, may wake more often.
  • Developing. By 4 months, it's common for many babies to:
There's a wide range of normal and children develop at different rates. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your child's development. 3. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, listening to your baby's heart and feeling pulses, checking hips, and paying attention to your baby's movements. 4. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect infants from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your baby get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your baby's next routine checkup at 6 months:
  • Feeding
  • If your doctor recommends introducing solids:

  • Share your family history of any food allergies.
  • Start with a small amount of iron-fortified single-grain cereal mixed with breast milk or formula. You can also start with a puréed meat, another iron-rich food.
  • Use an infant spoon — do not put cereal in your baby's bottle.
  • If your baby is pushing a lot out with the tongue, he or she may not be ready for solids yet. Wait a week or so before trying again.
  • Wait until your baby successfully eats cereal from the spoon before trying other solids. Introduce one new food at a time and wait several days to a week to watch for a possible allergic reaction before introducing another.
  • Breast milk or formula is still all your baby needs.
  • If breastfeeding, continue to give vitamin D supplements. Breastfed babies may need iron supplements until they get enough iron from the foods they eat.
  • Pay attention to signs that your baby is hungry or full.
  • Do not give juice until after 12 months.
  • Do not prop bottles or put your baby to bed with a bottle.
Routine Care
  • Many babies begin teething when they're around 4 months old. To help ease pain or discomfort, offer a clean wet washcloth or a teether. Talk to your doctor about giving acetaminophen for pain.
  • Sing, talk, read, and play with your baby. Babies learn best by interacting with people.
  • TV, videos, and other types of screen time aren't recommended for babies this young.
  • Continue to give your baby plenty of supervised "tummy time" when awake. Create a safe play space for your child to explore.
  • Limit the amount of time your baby spends in an infant seat, bouncer, or swing.
  • It's common for new moms to feel tired and overwhelmed at times. But if these feelings are intense, or you feel sad, moody, or anxious, call your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
Safety
  1. To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS):

  • Let your baby sleep in your room in a bassinet or crib next to the bed until your baby's first birthday or for at least 6 months, when the risk of SIDS is highest.
  • Always place your baby to sleep on a firm mattress on his or her back in a crib or bassinet without any crib bumpers, blankets, quilts, pillows, or plush toys.
  • Avoid overheating by keeping the room temperature comfortable.
  • Don't overbundle your baby.
  • Consider putting your baby to sleep sucking on a pacifier.
  1. Don't use an infant walker. They're dangerous and can cause serious injuries. Walkers also do not encourage walking and may actually hinder it.
  2. While your baby is awake, don't leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath.
  3. Keep small objects and harmful substances out of reach.
  4. Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat. Never leave your baby alone in the car.
  5. Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. Sunscreens are not recommended for infants younger than 6 months. However, you may use a small amount of sunscreen on an infant younger than 6 months if shade and clothing don't offer enough protection.
  6. Protect your baby from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  7. Be aware of any sources of lead in your home, including lead-based paint (in U.S. houses built before 1978).
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




6 months old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your baby's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is:

  1. Feeding. If you haven't already, it's time to introduce solids, starting with iron-fortified single-grain cereal or puréed meat. Let your doctor know if your baby has had any reactions (such as throwing up, diarrhea, or a rash) to a new food. Breast milk and formula still provide most of your baby's nutrition.
  2. Peeing and pooping. You may notice a change in your baby's poopy diapers after you introduce solids. The color and consistency may vary depending on what your baby eats. Let your doctor know if stools become hard, dry, or difficult to pass or if your baby has diarrhea.
  3. Sleeping. At 6 months, infants sleep about 12 to 16 hours per day, including two or three daytime naps. Most babies sleep for a stretch of at least 6 hours at night.
  4. Developing. By 6 months, it's common for many babies to:
  • look up when their name is called
  • say "ba," "da," and "ga" and start to babble ("babababa")
  • reach for and grasp objects
  • use a raking grasp (using the fingers to rake and pick up objects)
  • pass an object from one hand to the other
  • roll over both ways (back to front, front to back)
  • sit with support
There's a wide range of normal, and kids develop at different rates. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your child's development. 3. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed while you're present. This includes an eye exam, listening to your baby's heart and feeling pulses, checking hips, and paying attention to your baby's movements. 4. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect babies from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your next routine visit at 9 months: Feeding
  • If you're breastfeeding, continue for 12 months or for as long as you and your baby desire. Breastfed babies weaned before 12 months should be given iron-fortified formula. Wait until 12 months to switch from formula to cow's milk.
  1. Start giving your baby solid foods:

  • If there's a history of food allergies in your family, talk to your doctor before introducing new foods.
  • Begin with a small amount of iron-fortified single-grain cereal mixed with breast milk or formula. You can also offer puréed meat, another iron-rich food.
  • Use an infant spoon — do not put food in your baby's bottle.
  • Wait until your baby successfully eats cereal or puréed meat from the spoon before trying other single-ingredient new foods (puréed or soft fruits, vegetables, or other meats).
  • Introduce one new food at a time and wait a few days to a week to watch for any allergic reactions before introducing another.
Routine Care
  • Babies' first teeth often appear around 6 months. To ease teething discomfort, rub your baby's gums with a clean finger. Or offer a teething toy or a clean, wet washcloth, which can be frozen for 30 minutes first.

  • Wipe your baby's gums with a wet washcloth to clear away bacteria. When teeth come in, use a soft infant toothbrush with a tiny bit of toothpaste (about the size of a grain of rice) to clean your baby's teeth twice a day.
  • Between 6 and 9 months, babies who previously slept through the night may start waking up. Allow some time for your baby to settle back down. If fussiness continues, offer reassurance that you're there, but try not to pick up, play with, or feed your baby.
  • Sing, talk, play, and read to your baby every day. Babies learn best this way.
  • TV, videos, and other media are not recommended for babies this young.
  • Create a safe space for your baby to move around, play, and explore.
  • It's common for new moms to feel tired or overwhelmed at times. If these feelings are strong, or if you feel sad or anxious, call your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
Safety
  • Place your baby to sleep on the back, but it's OK if he or she rolls over.
  • Don't use an infant walker. They're dangerous and can cause serious injuries. Walkers do not encourage walking and may actually hinder it.
  • While your baby is awake, don't leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath.
  • Keep small objects and harmful substances out of reach.
  • Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat.
  • Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. You may use sunscreen (SPF 30) if shade and clothing don't offer enough protection.
  • Childproof your home. Get down on your hands and knees to look for potential dangers. Keep doors closed and put up gates, especially on stairways.
  • Limit your child's exposure to secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




9 months old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your baby's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Do a screening test that helps with the early identification of developmental delays. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about how your baby is:

  • Eating. Your baby should be eating a variety of baby foods, in addition to regular feedings of breast milk or formula. Your baby can probably drink from a cup and may try to self-feed with his or her fingers.
  • Peeing and pooping. You may notice a change in the color and consistency your baby's poopy diapers as you introduce new foods. Tell your doctor if your baby has diarrhea or has stools that are hard, dry, or difficult to pass.
  • Sleeping. The average amount of daily sleep is about 12 to 16 hours. Your baby is probably still taking two naps a day — one in the morning and another sometime after lunch — but every baby is different. Waking at night is common at this age.
Developing (milestones). By 9 months, it's common for many babies to:
  • say "mama" and "dada"
  • understand "no"
  • sit without support
  • pull to stand
  • walk along furniture ("cruising")
  • start to use thumb and forefinger to grasp objects (pincer grasp)
  • wave bye-bye
  • enjoy playing peek-a-boo
There's a wide range of normal, and children develop at different rates. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your child's development. 4. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, listening to your baby's heart and feeling pulses, checking hips, and paying attention to your baby's movements. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect babies from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect 6. Order a blood test. Your doctor may check for lead exposure or anemia. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your baby's next checkup at 12 months: Feeding If you're breastfeeding, continue for 12 months or for as long as you and your baby desire. Breastfed babies weaned before 12 months should be given iron-fortified formula. Wait until 12 months to switch from formula to cow's milk.
  • Don't give juice unless your doctor recommends it. Avoid sugary drinks like sodas.
  • If there's a history of food allergies in your family, talk to your doctor before introducing new foods.
  • Pay attention to signs your baby is hungry or full.
  • Pull the highchair up to the table during meals. Your baby will start to show interest in table foods. Give your baby a variety of tastes and textures, including foods that are pureed, mashed, and in soft lumps.
  • Give your child soft finger foods.
  • Avoid foods that can cause choking, such as whole grapes, raisins, popcorn, pretzels, nuts, hot dogs, sausages, chunks of meat, hard cheese, raw veggies, or hard fruits.
Routine Care & Safety
  • If your baby wakes up at night and doesn't settle back down, offer reassurance that you're there, but try not to pick up, play with, or feed your baby.
  • Separation anxiety often starts around 9 months. Keep good-byes short but loving. Your baby may be upset at first, but will calm down soon after you're gone.
  • Continue to keep your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat until age 2, or whenever your child reaches the weight or height limit set by the car-seat manufacturer.
  • Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. You may use sunscreen (SPF 30) if shade and clothing don't offer enough protection.
  • Brush your child's teeth with a soft toothbrush and a tiny bit of toothpaste (about the size of a grain of rice) twice a day. Schedule a dentist visit soon after the first tooth appears or by 1 year of age.
Keep up with childproofing:
  1. Install safety gates and tie up drapes, blinds, and cords.
  2. Keep locked up/out of reach: choking hazards; medicines; toxic substances; items that are hot, sharp, or breakable.
  3. Keep emergency numbers, including the Poison Help Line at 1-800-222-1222, near the phone.
  4. To prevent drowning, close bathroom doors, keep toilet seats down, and always supervise around water (including baths).
  1. Sing, talk, play, and read to your baby. Babies learn best this way.
  2. TV viewing (or other screen time, including computers) is not recommended for babies this young.
  3. Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  4. Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Lock up ammunition separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  5. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




12 months old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your toddler's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about how your child is:

  • Eating. By 12 months, toddlers are ready to switch from formula to cow's milk. Children may be breastfed beyond 1 year of age, if desired. Your child might move away from baby foods and be more interested in table foods. Offer a variety of soft table foods and avoid choking hazards.
  • Pooping. As you introduce more foods and whole milk, the appearance and frequency of your child's poopy diapers may change. Let your doctor know if your child has diarrhea, is constipated, or has poop that's hard to pass.
  • Sleeping. One-year-olds need about 11 to 14 hours of sleep a day, including one or two daytime naps.
Developing. By 1 year, it's common for many children to:
  • say "mama" and "dada" and one or two other words
  • follow a one-step command with gestures (such as pointing as you ask for a ball)
  • imitate gestures
  • stand alone
  • walk with one hand held and possibly take a few steps
  • precisely pick up object with thumb and forefinger
  • feed self with hands
  • enjoy peek-a-boo, pat-a-cake, and other social games
3. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. 4. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 5. Order tests. Your doctor may check for lead exposure, anemia, or tuberculosis if your child is at risk. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 15 months: Feeding
  • Give your child whole milk (not low-fat or skim milk, unless the doctor says to) until 2 years of age.
  • Limit your child's intake of cow's milk to about 16–24 ounces (480–720 ml) a day. Move from a bottle to a cup. If you're nursing, begin offering pumped breast milk in a cup.
  • Serve juice in a cup and limit it to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day. Avoid sugary drinks like soda.
  • Serve iron-fortified cereal and iron-rich foods (such as meat, tofu, sweet potatoes, and beans) in your child's diet.
  • Encourage self-feeding. Let your child practice with a spoon and a cup.
  • Have your child seated in a high chair or booster seat at the table when drinking and eating.
  • Serve three meals and two or three nutritious snacks a day. Don't be alarmed if your child seems to eat less than before. Growth slows during the second year and appetites tend to decrease. Talk to your doctor if you're concerned.
  • Avoid foods that can cause choking, such as whole grapes, raisins, popcorn, pretzels, nuts, hot dogs, sausages, chunks of meat, hard cheese, raw veggies, or hard fruits.
  • Avoid foods that are high in sugar and fat and low in nutrition.
Learning
  • Babies learn best by interacting with people. Make time to talk, sing, read, and play with your child every day.
  • TV viewing (or other screen time, including computers) is not recommended for those under 18 months old.
  • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring.
Routine Care & Safety
  • Keep up with childproofing:

  • Install safety gates and tie up drapes, blinds, and cords.
  • Keep locked up/out of reach: choking hazards; medicines; toxic substances; items that are hot, sharp, or breakable.
  • Brush your child's teeth with a soft toothbrush and a tiny bit of toothpaste (about the size of a grain of rice) twice a day. Schedule a dentist visit soon after the first tooth appears or by 1 year of age.
  • Continue to keep your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat until age 2, or whenever your child reaches the weight or height limit set by the car-seat manufacturer.
  • Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. You may use sunscreen (SPF 30) if shade and clothing are not protecting your baby from direct sun exposure.
  • Keep emergency numbers, including the Poison Control Help Line number at 1-800-222-1222, near the phone.
  • To prevent drowning, close bathroom doors, keep toilet seats down, and always supervise your child around water (including baths).
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




15 months old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address concerns, and provide guidance about how your toddler is:

  • Eating. By 15 months, most toddlers are eating a variety of foods and are better able to handle textures. Offer your toddler three meals and two or three scheduled nutritious snacks a day. Growth slows down in the second year of life so don't be surprised if your child's appetite has decreased. Your child can drink from a cup and may be able to use a spoon but probably prefers to finger-feed.
  • Pooping. As you introduce new foods and whole milk, the appearance and frequency of your child's poopy diapers may change from day to day. Let your doctor know if your child has diarrhea, is constipated, or has poop that's hard to pass.
  • Sleeping. There's a wide range of normal, but generally toddlers need about 12 to 14 hours of sleep a day, including one or two daytime naps.
Developing. By 15 months, it's common for many toddlers to:
  • say three to five words
  • understand and follow simple commands
  • point to one body part
  • walk alone and begin to run
  • climb on furniture
  • make marks with a crayon
  • imitate activities, such as housework
3. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, tooth exam, listening to the heart and lungs, and paying attention to your toddler's motor skills and behavior. 4. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 18 months: Feeding
  • Give your child whole milk (not low-fat or skim milk, unless your doctor recommends it) until 2 years of age.
  • Limit your child's intake of cow's milk to about 16–24 ounces (480–720 ml) a day.
  • Serve iron-fortified cereal and iron-rich foods, including meat, poultry, well-cooked leafy greens, beans (white, black, and kidney), and tofu.
  • Serve a variety of foods, but let your child decide what to eat and when he or she has had enough.
  • Transition from the bottle to a cup. If you're nursing, offer milk in a cup.
  • Serve juice in a cup and limit it to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day. Avoid sugary drinks like soda.
  • Avoid foods that are high in sugar and fat and low in nutrients.
  • Avoid foods that may cause choking, such as hot dogs, whole grapes, raw veggies, nuts, and hard fruits or candy.
Learning
  • Toddlers learn best by interacting with people. Make time to talk, read, sing, and play with your child every day.
  • Consider limiting your child's screen time. TV, videos, phones, tablets, and other media are not recommended for children younger than 18 months old.
  • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring.
Routine Care & Safety
  • Brush your child's teeth with a small toothbrush and a small bit of toothpaste (about the size of a grain of rice). Schedule a dentist visit if you haven't already done so.
  • Have a regular bedtime routine. If your child wakes up at night and doesn't settle back down, comfort your child but keep interactions brief.
  • Tantrums are common at this age, and tend to be worse when children are tired or hungry. Try to head off tantrums before they happen — find a distraction or remove your child from frustrating situations.
  • Give your child that much-wanted feeling of independance by offering two choices between acceptable options.
  • Praise good behavior and ignore behavior you don't like. Don't spank your child. Children don't make the connection between spanking and the behavior you're trying to correct. You can use a brief time-out to discipline your toddler.
  • Continue to keep your child in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat until age 2 or whenever your child reaches the weight or height limit set by the car-seat manufacturer.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher on your child's skin at least 15 minutes before going outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child fromsecondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Make sure your home is safe for your curious toddler:

  • Keep out of reach: choking hazards; cords; hot, sharp, and breakable items; and toxic substances (lock away medicine and household chemicals).
  • Keep emergency numbers, including the Poison Control Help Line number at 1-800-222-1222, near the phone.
  • Use safety gates and watch your toddler closely when on stairs.
  • To prevent drowning, close bathroom doors, keep toilet seats down, and always supervise your child around water (including baths).
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




18 months old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Do a screening test that helps identify developmental delays or autism. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and provide guidance about how your toddler is:

  • Eating. Feed your toddler three meals and two or three scheduled nutritious snacks a day. Growth slows in the second year so don't be surprised if your child's appetite decreases. Your child can drink from a cup and use a spoon but probably prefers to finger-feed.
  • Peeing and pooping. You may notice your child's diapers are dryer for longer periods, but most children do better with toilet training when they're a little bit older, usually between 2 and 3 years. Let your doctor know if your child has diarrhea, is constipated, or has poop that's hard to pass.
  • Sleeping. There's a wide range of normal, but generally toddlers need about 12 to 14 hours of sleep a day, including one or two daytime naps. By 18 months, most toddlers have given up their morning nap.
Developing. By 18 months, it's common for many toddlers to:
  • say 10–20 words
  • point to some body parts
  • run
  • walk up stairs with hand held
  • throw a ball
  • help with dressing and undressing
  • scribble with a crayon
  • engage in pretend play
4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, tooth exam, listening to the heart and lungs, and paying attention to your toddler's motor skills and behavior. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may test for lead exposure or anemia, if your child is at risk. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 2 years: Feeding
  • Give your child whole milk (not low-fat or skim milk, unless your doctor recommends it) until 2 years of age.
  • Serve milk and juice in a cup and limit juice to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day. Avoid sugary drinks like soda.
  • Continue serving a variety of healthy foods. Offer iron-rich foods like beans and meat, vegetables, and fruit. Let your child decide what to eat and when he or she has had enough.
  • Learning
  • Toddlers learn best by interacting with people and exploring their environment. Make time to talk, read, sing, and play with your child every day.
  • Consider limiting your child's screen time (TV, videos, phones, tablets, and other media). Less than 1 hour a day is best, and choose quality programs to watch with your child.
  • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring and active play.
Routine Care & Safety
  • Watch for signs that your toddler is ready to start potty training, including showing interest in the toilet, staying dry for longer periods, and pulling pants up and down.
  • Set up a potty chair and let your child come in the bathroom with you.
  • Brush your child's teeth with a soft toothbrush and a tiny bit of toothpaste (about the size of a grain of rice). If you haven't already, schedule a dentist visit.
  • Toddlers look for independence and will test limits. Be sure to set reasonable and consistent rules.
  • Tantrums are common at this age, and tend to be worse when kids are tired or hungry. Try to head off tantrums before they happen — find a distraction or remove your child from frustrating situations.
  • Don't spank your child. Children don't make the connection between spanking and the behavior you're trying to correct. You can use a brief time-out to discipline your toddler.
  • Have a normal bedtime routine. If your child wakes up at night and doesn't settle back down, offer reassurance that you're there, but keep interactions brief.
  • Keep your child in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat until age 2 or whenever your child reaches the highest weight or height limit allowed by the car-seat manufacturer.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher on your child's skin at least 15 minutes before going outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Make sure your home is safe for your curious toddler:

  • Keep out of reach: choking hazards; cords; hot, sharp, and breakable items; and toxic substances (lock away medicine and household chemicals).
  • Keep emergency numbers, including the Poison Control Help Line number at 1-800-222-1222, near the phone.
  • Use safety gates and watch your toddler closely when on stairs.
  • To prevent drowning, close bathroom doors, keep toilet seats down, and always supervise your child around water (including baths).
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




2 years old (24 months)


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight, height, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. Your doctor will also calculate and plot your child's body mass index (BMI). 2. Administer a screening (test) that helps with the early identification of autism. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and provide guidance about how your toddler is:

  1. Eating. Don't be surprised if your toddler skips meals occasionally or loves something one day and won't touch it the next. Schedule three meals and two or three nutritious snacks a day. You're in charge of the menu, but let your child be in charge of how much of it he or she eats.
  2. Peeing and pooping. Most children are ready to begin potty training between 2 and 3 years. You may have noticed signs your child is ready to start potty training, including:
    • showing interest in the toilet (watching a parent or sibling in the bathroom, sitting on potty chair)
    • staying dry for longer periods
    • pulling pants down and up with assistance
    • connecting feeling of having to go with peeing and pooping
    • communicating that diaper is wet or dirty
  3. Sleeping. Generally 2-year-olds need about 11 to 14 hours of sleep a day, including one nap.
Developing. By 2 years, it's common for many children to:
  • say more than 50 words
  • put two words together to form a sentence ("I go!")
  • be understood at least half the time
  • follow a two-step command ("Pick up the ball and bring it to me.")
  • run well
  • kick a ball
  • walk down stairs
  • make lines and circular scribbles
  • play alongside other children
4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, tooth exam, listening to the heart and lungs, and paying attention to your toddler's motor skills, use of language, and behavior. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for lead exposure, anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 30 months: Feeding
  • Food "jags" are common during the toddler years. Even if your child seems to get stuck on one food, continue to offer a variety of nutritious choices.
  • Let your child decide what to eat, and when he or she is full. Serve healthy snacks and avoid sugary drinks.
  • Switch to low-fat or nonfat milk, or a fortified-milk alternative like almond or soy milk. Offer dairy products that are low-fat or nonfat.
  • Limit juice to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day.
  • Learning
  • Toddlers learn by interacting with parents, caregivers, and their environment. Limit screen time (TV, computers, tablets, or other screens) to no more than 1–2 hours a day of quality children's programming. Watch with your child.
  • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring and active play. Play often together.
  • Read to your child every day.
Routine Care & Safety
  • Let your child brush his or her teeth with your guidance. Twice a day, use a small amount of toothpaste (about the size of a pea) with a soft toothbrush. Go over any areas that may have been missed. If you haven't already, schedule a dentist visit.
  • Look for the signs that your child is ready to start potty training. If he or she doesn't show interest, it's OK to wait before trying again. A child who uses the potty and is accident-free during the day may still need a diaper at night.
  • Set reasonable and consistent rules. Use praise to encourage good behavior and be positive when redirecting unwanted behavior
  • Tantrums are common at this age, and tend to be worse when children are tired or hungry. Try to head off tantrums before they happen — find a distraction or remove your child from frustrating situations.
  • Don't spank your child. Children don't make the connection between spanking and the behavior you're trying to correct. You can use a brief time-out to discipline your toddler.
  • Keep your child in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the highest weight or height limit allowed by the seat's manufacturer. Previous advice was to turn kids around by age 2. Now, safety experts say to do this based on a child's size, not age. So, small children can stay rear-facing until age 3 or 4.
  • Watch your child closely when playing outside and on playground equipment. Make sure your child always wears a helmet when riding a tricycle or is in a seat on an adult bicycle.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




2 ½ years old (30 months)


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Give a screening (test) that helps with the early identification of developmental delays. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer guidance about how your child is: Eating. Don't be surprised if your toddler skips meals occasionally or loves something one day and won't touch it the next. Schedule three meals and two or three nutritious snacks a day. You're in charge of the menu, but let your child be in charge of how much of it he or she eats. Peeing and pooping. Most toddlers are ready to begin potty training when they're between 2 and 3 years old. Signs that your child is ready to start potty training include:

  • showing interest in toilet (watching parent or sibling in the bathroom, sitting on potty chair)
  • staying dry for longer periods
  • pulling pants down and up with assistance
  • connecting feeling of having to go with peeing and pooping
  • communicating that diaper is wet or dirty
Sleeping. Your child needs about 11 to 14 hours of sleep. This might still include one afternoon nap. Developing. By 30 months, it's common for many toddlers to:
  • speak using pronouns (I, me, you)
  • identify body parts
  • wash and dry hands
  • pull pants up with assistance
  • jump in place
  • throw a ball, overhand
  • match shapes and colors
  • begin to play with other children
4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, listening to the heart and lungs, and paying attention to your toddler's coordination, use of language, and social skills. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 3 years: Feeding
  • Eat meals together as a family whenever possible.
  • Serve low-fat or nonfat milk or a fortified milk alternative, like soy or almond milk. Offer other low-fat and nonfat dairy products.
  • Limit juice to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day. Avoid high-sugar and high-fat foods and drinks.
Learning
  • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring, make-believe, and active play.
  • Read to your child daily to encourage language development and help prepare him or her for preschool.
  • Repeat back to your child what he or she says. This shows that you understood what was said and helps your child learn the right words.
  • Consider enrolling your child in a preschool program or arranging play dates to help build social skills.
  • Limit screen time (TV, computers, tablets, and smartphones) to no more than 1 to 2 hours a day of quality children's programming. Keep TVs and other screens out of your child's bedroom.
Routine Care & Safety
  • Children may brush their teeth with a soft toothbrush and a small amount of toothpaste (no more than the size of a pea). Let your child brush his or her teeth with your guidance. Go over any areas that may have been missed. If you haven't already, schedule a dentist visit.
  • Be positive about potty training. Praise your child's efforts and don't force your child to use the potty or punish your child for accidents.
  • Set reasonable and consistent rules. Use praise to encourage good behavior and calmly redirect unwanted behavior.
  • Give your child a sense of independence by giving two choices between two acceptable options. More than two can be overwhelming.
  • Tantrums, while less frequent now, tend to be worse when kids are tired or hungry. Try to head off tantrums before they happen — find a distraction or remove your child from frustrating situations.
  • Don't spank. Children don't make the connection between spanking and the behavior you're trying to correct. You can use a brief time-out to discipline your toddler.
  • Most toddlers are ready to move from a crib to a regular bed with safety rails when they're between 2 and 3 years old. Follow a regular bedtime routine that will help your child settle into a good night's sleep.
  • Watch your toddler closely when playing outside and on playground equipment. Make sure your child wears a helmet when riding a bike or trike.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Keep your child in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the highest weight or height limit allowed by the seat's manufacturer. Previous advice was to turn kids around by age 2. Now, safety experts say to do this based on a child's size, not age. So, small children can stay rear-facing until age 3 or 4.
  • To prevent drowning, don't leave your child alone in the bathtub or in a pool, no matter how shallow the water.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




3 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure and vision, if your child is able to cooperate. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer guidance about how your child is: Eating. Growth is slow and steady during the preschool years. Offer three meals and two nutritious snacks a day. Even if your child is a picky eater, keep offering a variety of healthy foods. Peeing and pooping. Your preschooler may be potty trained or using the potty during the day. Even so, it is common for kids this age to have an occasional accident during the day and still need a diaper at night. If your child has not yet shown the signs of being ready to potty train, tell your doctor. Also let the doctor know if your child is constipated, has diarrhea, seems to be "holding it," or was potty trained but is now having problems. Sleeping. Preschoolers sleep about 10–13 hours a day. Most kids this age still take a nap during the day. Developing. By 3 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • string three or more words together to form short sentences
  • be understood most of the time when they speak
  • pedal a tricycle
  • jump forward
  • copy a circle
  • dress and undress with a little help
  • play make-believe
  • take turns while playing
4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, teeth exam, listening to the heart and lungs, and paying attention to speech and language development. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for anemia, lead exposure, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 4 years: Feeding
  • Preschoolers should get 2 cups (480 ml) of low-fat or nonfat milk (or equivalent low-fat dairy products) daily. You also can give a fortified milk alternative like soy or almond milk.
  • Limit juice to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day. Avoid high-sugar and high-fat foods and drinks.
  • Let your child decide when he or she is hungry or full. If your child chooses not to eat, offer a healthy snack later.
  • Try to eat together as a family most nights of the week.
Routine Care
  • If your child gives up the afternoon nap, be sure to allow for some quiet "winding down" time during the day. You may also need to adjust bedtime to ensure your child gets enough sleep.
  • Nightmares and night awakenings are common at this age. If you haven't already, set up a regular bedtime routine to help your child fall asleep at night. Avoid scary or upsetting images or stories, especially before bed.
  • If you've enrolled your child in preschool, visit the classroom together a few times before school starts. If your child is not in preschool, look for opportunities to interact and play with other kids.
  • Limit screen time (TV shows, DVDs, smartphones, video games, tablets, and computers) to no more than 1 to 2 hours a day of quality children's programming. Keep screens out of your child's bedroom.
  • Read to your child every day.
  • Set reasonable and consistent rules. Praise good behavior and calmly redirect unwanted behavior.
  • Do not spank your child. Use time-outs instead.
  • Have your child brush teeth twice a day with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Schedule a dentist visit to have your child's teeth examined and cleaned.
Safety
  • Have a safe play area and allow plenty of time for exploring, make-believe, and active play.
  • Make sure playground equipment is well maintained and age-appropriate for your child. Surfaces should be soft to absorb falls (sand, rubber mats, or a deep layer of wood or rubber chips).
  • Always supervise your child around water and when playing near streets.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Make sure your child always wears a helmet when riding a tricycle or bicycle.
  • If your child is still in a rear-facing car seat, check the maximum weight and height limits recommended by the manufacturer. Turn the car seat around when your child is the right size. Kids should stay harnessed in the car seat until they reach the highest weight or height limit allowed by the seat's manufacturer.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




4 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure, vision, and hearing using standard testing equipment. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about how your child is: Eating. Schedule three meals and two nutritious snacks a day. If you have a picky eater, keep offering a variety of healthy foods for your child to choose from. Kids should be encouraged to give new foods a try, but don't force them to eat them. Peeing and pooping. By 4 years old, most kids are using the toilet. But many preschoolers who are potty trained during the day are not able to stay dry all night. It's also common for busy preschoolers to have an occasional daytime accident. Look for signs of "holding it" and encourage regular potty breaks. Talk to your doctor if your child is not yet potty trained or was previously trained and is now having problems. Sleeping. Preschoolers sleep about 10–13 hours a day. Many 4-year-olds have given up their afternoon nap, but be sure to schedule some quiet time during the day. Developing. By 4 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • be completely understood by strangers
  • know their first and last name and gender
  • relate events or tell a story
  • hop on one foot
  • walk up stairs, alternating feet
  • identify some colors and numbers
  • enjoy playing with other children
4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include listening to the heart and lungs, observing motor skills, and talking to your child to assess speech and language development. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for anemia, lead, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 5 years: Eating
  • Make time to eat together as a family most nights of the week.
  • Serve a variety of healthy foods, including lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  • Preschoolers should get 2.5 cups (600 ml) of low-fat milk (or equivalent low-fat dairy products) daily. You can also give a fortified milk substitute like soy or almond milk.
  • Limit juice to no more than 4–6 ounces (120–180 ml) a day.
Routine Care
  • To help prepare your child for kindergarten:

  • Keep consistent daily routines and times for meals, snacks, playing, reading, cleaning up, waking up, and going to bed.
  • Practice counting numbers and singing the ABCs, along with other songs and rhymes.
  • Read to your child every day.
  • Encourage drawing, coloring, and recognizing and writing letters.
  • Allow your child to take some responsibility for self-care, including going to the bathroom, washing hands, brushing teeth, and getting dressed. Offer reminders and help when needed.
  • Teach your child your home address and phone number.
  • Let your child be active every day while under adult supervision. Be active as a family.
  • Limit screen time (TV shows, DVDs, smartphones, video games, tablets, and computers) to no more than 1 hour a day of quality children's programming. Keep TVs and devices out of your child's bedroom.
  • If your child doesn't go to preschool, look for opportunities for playing and interacting with other kids.
  • Have your child brush teeth twice a day with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Schedule regular dental checkups as recommended by your child's dentist.
Safety
  • Supervise your child outdoors, especially when playing around water and near streets. Consider enrolling your child in a swimming class.
  • Make sure playground equipment is well maintained and age-appropriate. Surfaces should be soft to absorb falls (sand, rubber mats, or a deep layer of wood or rubber chips).
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Make sure your child always wears a helmet when riding a tricycle or bicycle.
  • If your child is still in a rear-facing car seat, check the maximum weight and height limits recommended by the manufacturer. Turn the car seat around when your child is the right size. Kids should stay harnessed in the car seat until they reach the highest weight or height limit allowed by the seat's manufacturer. When your child has outgrown this seat, switch to a belt-positioning booster seat until your child is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall, usually between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Discuss appropriate touch. Teach your child that some body parts are private and no one should see or touch them. Tell your child to come to you if anyone ever asks to look at or touch his or her private parts, if he or she is ever asked to look at or touch someone else's private parts, or is asked to keep a secret.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




5 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure, vision, and hearing using standard testing equipment. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. Schedule three meals and one or two nutritious snacks a day. If you have a picky eater, keep offering a variety of healthy foods for your child to choose from. Kids should be encouraged to give new foods a try, but don't force them to eat. Bathroom habits. By now, your child should be able to go to the bathroom alone. Constipation may become a problem because some children are embarrassed to use the bathroom at school. Remind your child to take regular bathroom breaks and not to "hold it." Talk to your doctor if you have concerns about your child's bathroom habits. Sleeping. Kids this age generally sleep about 10–11 hours each night. Most 5-year-olds no longer nap during the day. To help your child get enough sleep, you might need to set an earlier bedtime. Development. By 5 years, it's common for many children to:

  • know their address and phone number
  • tell stories using full sentences
  • recognize and print some letters
  • draw a person with head, body, arms, and legs
  • skip
  • walk down stairs, alternating feet
  • count their fingers
  • dress by themselves
4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include listening to the heart and lungs, observing motor skills, and talking with your child to assess language skills. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for anemia, lead, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 6 years: Eating
  • Serve your child a well-balanced diet that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products.
  • Kids this age should get 2.5 cups (600 ml) of low-fat milk or fortified milk alternative (or other low-fat dairy products) daily.
  • Limit juice to no more than 4 ounces (120 ml) a day. Avoid high-sugar and high-fat foods and drinks.
  • Make time to eat together as a family. Turn off the TV and put away devices.
Routine Care
  • Allow plenty of time for physical activity and free play every day. Do it as a family.
  • Limit screen time (TV shows, DVDs, smartphones, video games, tablets, and computers) to no more than 1 to 2 hours a day of quality children's programming. Keep TVs and devices out of your child's bedroom.
  • Have your child brush teeth twice a day with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Schedule regular dental checkups as recommended by your child's dentist.
  • To help prepare your child for kindergarten:

  • Practice counting and singing the ABCs.
  • Encourage drawing, coloring, and recognizing and writing letters.
  • Keep consistent daily routines and times for meals, snacks, playing, reading, cleaning up, waking up, and going to bed.
  • Allow your child to take some responsibility for self-care, including going to the bathroom, washing hands, brushing teeth, and getting dressed. Offer reminders and help when needed.
  • Teach your child your home address and phone number.
  • Read to your child every day.
Safety
  • Teach your child the skills needed to cross the street independently (looking both ways, listening for traffic), but continue to help your child cross the street until age 10 or older.
  • Make sure your child always wears a helmet when riding a bicycle (even one with training wheels). Do not allow your child to ride in the street.
  • Make sure playground surfaces are soft enough to absorb the shock of falls.
  • Always supervise your child around water, and consider enrolling your child in a swimming class.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapors from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Keep your child in a belt-positioning booster seat in the backseat until he or she is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall. Kids reach this height usually between 8 and 12 years old.
  • Teach your child what to do in case of an emergency, including how to dial 911.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Discuss appropriate touch. Explain that certain parts of the body are private and no one should see or touch them. Tell your child to come to you if someone asks to look at or touch his or her private parts, is asked to look at or touch someone else's, or is asked to keep a secret from you.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
  • These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




6 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure, vision, and hearing using standard testing equipment. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. Schedule three meals and one or two nutritious snacks a day. Serve your child a well-balanced diet that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. Kids this age should get 2½ cups (600 ml) of low-fat milk daily (or equivalent low-fat dairy products or a fortified milk alternative). Limit foods and drinks that are high in sugar and fat, and offer no more than 4–6 ounces (120–180 ml) of 100% juice per day. If you have a picky eater, keep offering a variety of healthy foods for your child to choose from. Kids should be encouraged to give new foods a try, but don't force them to eat them. Bathroom habits. Bladder and bowel control is usually mastered by this age. Bedwetting is more common in boys and deep sleepers, and in most cases it ends on its own. But talk to your doctor if your child was previously dry at night and is now wetting the bed. Sleeping. Kids this age need about 9 to 12 hours of sleep per night. Lack of sleep can cause behavior problems and make it hard to pay attention at school. Set a bedtime that allows for enough sleep and establish a relaxing bedtime routine. Turn off the TV and digital devices at least 1 hour before bedtime, and keep them out of your child's bedroom. Physical activity. Children this age should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Development. By 6 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • walk heel-to-toe
  • tie their shoes
  • start reading, spelling, and doing simple addition and subtraction
  • write their first and last names and short sentences
  • begin to know the difference between fantasy and reality
4. Do a physical exam with your child undressed while you are present. This will include listening to the heart and lungs, observing motor skills, and talking with your child to assess language skills. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, lead, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 7 years:
  • Praise your child's accomplishments and provide support in areas where he or she is struggling.
  • Reinforce rules and set appropriate limits. At this age, it's normal for kids to test the boundaries of established rules. Decide which rules can be eased and which must remain in place.
  • Teach your child the skills needed to cross the street independently (looking both ways, listening for traffic), but continue to help your child cross the street until age 10 or older.
  • Make sure your child always wears a helmet when riding a bike (even one with training wheels). Don't allow your child to ride in the street.
  • Make sure playground surfaces are soft enough to absorb the shock of falls.
  • Always supervise your child around water, and consider enrolling your child in a swimming class.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke, which increases the risk of heart and lung disease. Secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes is also harmful.
  • Keep your child in a belt-positioning booster seat in the back seat until he or she is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall, usually between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Teach your child what to do in case of an emergency, including how to dial 911.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Discuss appropriate touch. Explain that certain parts of the body are private and no one should see or touch them. Tell your child to come to you if someone asks to look at or touch his or her private parts, is ever asked to look at or touch someone else's, or is asked to keep a secret from you.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




7 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure using standard testing equipment. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. Schedule three meals and one or two nutritious snacks a day. Serve your child a well-balanced diet that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. Kids this age should get 2½ cups (600 ml) of low-fat milk daily (or equivalent low-fat dairy products or fortified milk alternative). Limit foods and drinks that are high in sugar and fat, and offer no more than 8 ounces (240 ml) of juice per day. If you have a picky eater, keep offering a variety of healthy foods for your child to choose from. Kids should be encouraged to give new foods a try, but don't force them to eat them. Bathroom habits. Bedwetting is more common in boys and deep sleepers, and in most cases it ends on its own. But talk to your doctor if it continues to be a problem. Sleeping. Kids this age need about 9–12 hours of sleep per night. Lack of sleep can cause behavior problems and make it difficult to pay attention at school. Set a regular bedtime that allows for adequate sleep and establish a relaxing bedtime routine. Keep TVs and digital devices, including phones and tablets, out of bedrooms. Physical activity. Children this age should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By 7 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • show more independence from parents and family members
  • have a group of friends, usually of the same gender
  • look up to role models, such as professional athletes, actors, or superheroes
  • know the difference between right and wrong
  • enjoy reading
  • have longer attention spans
  • problem solve in a more organized and logical way
  • perform more coordinated tasks, like shooting a basketball
4. Do a physical exam. This will include listening to the heart and lungs, checking teeth for cavities, and watching your child walk. Because some kids start to show signs of puberty as early as age 7, your doctor will check pubertal development. A parent or caregiver should be present during this exam. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for anemia and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 8 years: School
  • Encourage your child to participate in a variety of activities, including music, arts and crafts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your child struggles.
  • Poor school performance could be a sign of a learning disability, attention problems, or of being bullied. Talk to the teacher about your concerns so that your child can receive the help needed to succeed.
Self
  • Explain to your child that his or her body will change and that this is normal. Teach the proper names for body parts and explain their functions. Let your child know that it's never OK for an adult to ask a child to keep a secret from you. No one should look at or touch your child's private parts, or ask him or her to look at or touch theirs.
  • Make sure your child brushes his or her teeth twice daily, flosses once a day, and sees a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Set fair and consistent consequences for breaking the rules. Don't hit or spank your child.
  • Give your child a sense of responsibility by letting him or her participate in simple chores, like making the bed and setting the table.
Safety
  • Your child should continue to ride in the back seat of the car and use a belt-positioning booster seat until he or she is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall, usually between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Make sure your child wears a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter, and that he or she only rides in the daytime.
  • Teach your child the skills needed to cross the street independently (looking both ways, listening for cars), but continue to help your child cross the street until age 10.
  • Teach your child what to do in case of an emergency, including when to dial 911.
  • Teach your child to swim, but don't allow swimming unless an adult is watching.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke and secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes.
  • Explain to your child why he or she should never try tobacco products, e-cigarettes, drugs, or alcohol.
  • Monitor your child's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your child is doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your child has visited. Teach your child to never share private information online.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




8 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure using standard testing equipment. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. Schedule three meals and one or two nutritious snacks a day. Serve your child a well-balanced diet that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. Kids this age should get 2½ cups (600 ml) of low-fat milk daily (or equivalent low-fat dairy products or fortified milk alternative). Limit high-sugar and high-fat foods and drinks, and offer no more than 8 ounces (240 ml) of 100% juice per day. Bathroom habits. Bedwetting is more common in boys and deep sleepers, and in most cases it ends on its own. But talk to your doctor if it continues to be a problem. Sleeping. Kids this age need about 9-12 hours of sleep per night. Lack of sleep can make it hard to pay attention at school. Set a regular bedtime that allows for enough sleep and encourage your child to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Keep TVs and digital devices, like smartphones and tablets, out of your child's bedroom. Physical activity. Kids this age should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By 8 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • show more independence from parents and family members
  • have a group of friends, usually of the same gender
  • look up to role models, such as professional athletes, actors, or superheroes
  • know the difference between right and wrong
  • enjoy reading
  • solve simple math problems
  • have longer attention spans and cooperate more
  • problem solve in a more organized and logical way
  • do more coordinated tasks, like shoot a basketball
4. Do a physical exam. This will include listening to the heart and lungs, examining teeth for cavities, and watching your child walk. Because some children start to show signs of puberty as early as age 7, your pediatrician will check pubertal development. A parent or caregiver should be present during this exam. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 9 years: School
  • Encourage your child to participate in a variety of activities, including music, arts and crafts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your child struggles.
  • Poor school performance could be a sign of a learning disability, attention problems, or of being bullied. Talk to the teacher about your concerns so that your child can get the help needed to succeed.
Self
  • Explain to your child that his or her body will change and that this is normal. Teach the proper names for body parts and explain their functions. Let your child know that it's never OK for an adult to ask a child to keep a secret from you. No one should look at or touch your child's private parts, or ask him or her to look at or touch theirs.
  • Make sure your child brushes his or her teeth twice daily, flosses once a day, and sees a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Set fair and consistent consequences for breaking the rules. Do not spank or hit your child.
  • Give your child a sense of responsibility by letting him or her participate in simple chores, like making the bed and setting the table.
Safety
  • Your child should continue to ride in the back seat of the car and use a belt-positioning booster seat until he or she is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall, usually between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Make sure your child wears a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter, and that he or she only rides in the daytime.
  • Teach your child the skills needed to cross the street independently (looking both ways, listening for cars), but continue to help your child cross the street until age 10.
  • Teach your child what to do in case of an emergency, including when to dial 911.
  • Teach your child to swim, but do not allow swimming unless an adult is watching.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside to play and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke and secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes.
  • Explain to your child why he or she should never try tobacco products, e-cigarettes, drugs, or alcohol.
  • Monitor your child's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your child is doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your child has visited. Teach your child not to share personal information.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




9 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure using standard testing equipment. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. Schedule three meals and one or two nutritious snacks a day. Serve your child a well-balanced diet that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. Kids this age should get 3 cups (720 ml) of low-fat milk daily (or of low-fat dairy products or fortified milk alternative). Aim for five servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Limit high-sugar and high-fat foods and drinks, and offer no more than 8 ounces (240 ml) of 100% juice per day. Sleeping. Kids this age need about 9 to 12 hours of sleep per night. Lack of sleep can make it hard to pay attention at school. Set a bedtime that allows for enough sleep and encourage your child to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Keep TVs and digital devices out of your child's bedroom. Physical activity. Kids this age should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By 9 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • show more independence from family and begin to prefer being with friends
  • have friends of the same gender
  • read to learn about a topic of interest
  • handle increasingly difficult tasks in school, like gathering and organizing information into a book report
  • begin to take on chores at home and handle more homework
  • begin to show the signs of puberty (oily skin, acne, body odor). Girls may start breast development and grow hair in the armpit and pubic area. Boys also may develop body hair in addition to testicle and penis enlargement.
4. Do a physical exam. This will include listening to the heart and lungs, examining the back for any curvature of the spine, and checking for the signs of puberty. A parent, caregiver, or chaperone should be present during this part of the exam, but siblings should remain outside in the waiting room to give your child privacy. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may check your child's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 10 years: School
  • Encourage your child to participate in a variety of activities, including music, arts and crafts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interests. But try to avoid overscheduling and allow for some downtime.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your child struggles.
  • Provide a quiet place to do homework. Minimize distractions, such as TV and devices.
  • As schoolwork gets harder, your child may struggle academically. If this happens, work with your child's school to find the cause, such as learning or attention problems, bullying, or other stressors.
  • Talk to your child about the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs.
  • Teach your child to use technology wisely. General rule: Don't text, post, or send pictures online that you wouldn't want a grandparent to see.
Self
  • Spend time with your child every day. Share mealtimes and be active together. Talk about things that are important to your child.
  • Set rules and let your child know your expectations. Use fair consequences for breaking the rules. Praise your child's good choices.
  • Be prepared to answer questions about puberty and the feelings associated with those changes. Encourage your child to bring questions or concerns to you. Girls usually get their first period about 2 years after breast development (between ages 9 and 16). Boys may have wet dreams and their voices may begin to deepen and crack.
  • Encourage kids to bathe or shower daily. If body odor is a concern, have your child use a deodorant.
  • Tell your child that no one else should touch or ask to see his or her private areas or ask him or her to touch their private areas.
  • Kids should brush their teeth twice daily, floss once a day, and see a dentist once every 6 months.
Safety
  • Your child should continue to ride in the back seat of the car and use a belt-positioning booster seat until he or she is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall, usually between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Make sure your child wears a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter.
  • Teach your child to swim, but do not allow swimming unless an adult is watching.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke and secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes.
  • Monitor your child's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your kids are doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your child has visited. Teach your child not to share personal information.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




10 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure, vision, and hearing using standard testing equipment. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. Schedule three meals and one or two nutritious snacks a day. Serve your child a well-balanced diet that includes lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. Kids this age should get 3 cups (720 ml) of low-fat milk daily (or equivalent low-fat dairy products or fortified milk substitute). Aim for five servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Limit high-sugar and high-fat foods and drinks, and offer no more than 8 ounces (240 ml) of 100% juice per day. Sleeping. Kids this age need about 9–12 hours of sleep per night. Lack of sleep can make it hard to pay attention at school. Set a bedtime that allows for enough sleep and encourage your child to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Keep TVs and digital devices out of your child's bedroom. Physical activity. Kids this age should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By 10 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • show more independence from family and begin to prefer being with friends
  • have friends of the same gender
  • read to learn about a topic of interest
  • accomplish increasingly difficult tasks in school, like gathering and organizing information into a book report
  • begin to take on chores at home and handle more homework
  • begin to show the signs of puberty (oily skin, acne, body odor). Girls may start breast development and grow hair in the armpit and pubic area. Boys also may develop body hair in addition to testicle and penis enlargement.
4. Do a physical exam. This will include listening to the heart and lungs, examining the back for any curvature of the spine, and checking for the signs of puberty. A parent, caregiver, or chaperone should be present during this part of the exam, but siblings should remain outside in the waiting room to give your child privacy. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may check your child's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 11 years: School
  • Encourage your child to participate in a variety of activities, including music, arts and crafts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest. But try to avoid overscheduling and allow for some downtime.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your child struggles.
  • Provide a quiet place to do homework. Minimize distractions, such as TV and cell phones.
  • As schoolwork gets harder, your child may struggle academically. If this happens, work with the school staff to determine the cause, such a learning or attention problem, bullying, or other stressors.
  • Talk to your child about the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs.
  • Teach your child to use technology wisely. A general rule: Don't text, post, or send pictures online that you couldn't share with a grandparent.
Self
  • Spend time with your child every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your child.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking. Praise good choices.
  • Be prepared to answer questions about puberty and the feelings associated with those changes. Encourage your child to bring questions or concerns to you. Girls usually get their first period about 2 years after breast development (between ages 10 and 13). Boys may have wet dreams and their voices may begin to deepen and crack.
  • Encourage your child to bathe or shower daily. If body odor is a concern, have your child use a deodorant.
  • Remind your child that his or her private areas are private and that no one else should touch them or ask him or her to touch their private areas.
  • Make sure your child brushes his or her teeth twice daily, flosses once a day, and sees a dentist once every 6 months.
Safety
  • Your child should continue to ride in the back seat of the car and use a belt-positioning booster seat until he or she is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall, usually between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Make sure your child wears a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter.
  • Teach your child to swim but do not allow swimming unless an adult is watching.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke and secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes.
  • Monitor your child's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your child is doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your child has visited. Teach your child not to give out personal information.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




11 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure using standard testing equipment. Your child's hearing may be checked. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. At this age, kids should begin making healthy food choices on their own. Your child's diet should include lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. Kids this age should get 3 cups (720 ml) of low-fat or nonfat milk (or of low-fat or nonfat dairy products or milk alternative) daily. Aim for five servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Sleeping. Kids this age need about 9-12 hours of sleep per night. Lack of sleep can make it hard to pay attention at school. Set a bedtime that allows for enough sleep and encourage your child to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Keep TVs and all digital devices out of your child's bedroom. Physical activity. Kids this age should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set daily limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By 11 years, it's common for many kids to:

  • Show some signs of puberty:

  • In girls, puberty usually starts when they're between 8 and 13 with breast development and the appearance of pubic hair. Menstruation usually follows about 2 years after breast development begins.
  • In boys, testicular enlargement is the first sign of puberty. This happens around age 11, but may start as early as 9 and as late as 15. Penile lengthening and the appearance of pubic hair follow.
  • have oily skin and/or acne
  • not always connect their actions with future consequences
  • want to be independent and fit in with peers
  • focus on personal appearance and behavior (they think all eyes are on them)
  • want to engage in risky behaviors
After talking with you, the doctor may request some time alone with your child to answer any additional questions. 4. Do a physical exam. This will include looking at the skin, listening to the heart and lungs, examining the back for any curvature of the spine, and checking for the signs of puberty. A parent, caregiver, or chaperone should be present during this part of the exam, but siblings should remain outside in the waiting room to give your child privacy. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may check your child's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 12 years: School
  • Encourage your child to participate in a variety of activities, including music, arts and crafts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your child struggles.
  • Provide a quiet place to do homework. Minimize distractions, such as TV and devices.
  • As schoolwork gets harder, your child may struggle academically. If this happens, work with the school staff to find the cause, such a learning or attention problem, bullying, or other stressors.
  • Peer pressure can lead to risky behaviors, such as drinking or smoking. Make sure you know who your child spends time with and that an adult is monitoring them.
Self
  • Spend time with your child every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your child.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking. Praise good choices.
  • Be prepared to answer questions about puberty and the feelings associated with those changes. Be open to questions about gender identity and sexuality. Encourage your child to bring questions or concerns to you.
  • Encourage your child to wait until he or she is older to engage in sexual activity with others. Explain the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unwanted pregnancy.
  • Encourage your child to bathe or shower daily. If body odor is a concern, have your child use a deodorant.
  • Make sure your child brushes his or her teeth twice daily, flosses once a day, and sees a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Look for signs of depression, which can include irritability, sadness, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide.
Safety
  • Talk to your child about the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs.
  • Preteens should continue to ride in the back seat and always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle. Your child should use a belt-positioning booster seat until he or she is 4 feet 9 inches (150 cm) tall, usually between 8 and 12 years of age.
  • Make sure your child wears a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter.
  • Apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before your child goes outside and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke and secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes.
  • Monitor your child's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your child is doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your child has visited.
  • Talk to your child about online safety and cyberbullying. Warn of the risks of sharing personal information.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




12 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your child's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your child's blood pressure and vision using standard testing equipment. Hearing may be checked. 3. Give a screening test that helps identify children with depression. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your child's: Eating. At this age, kids should begin making healthy food choices on their own. Your child's diet should include lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy. Kids this age should get 3 cups (720 ml) of low-fat or nonfat milk (or of low-fat or nonfat dairy products) daily. Aim for five servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Limit high-sugar and high-fat foods and drinks. Sleeping. Kids this age need about 9–12 hours of sleep per night. Lack of sleep can make it hard to pay attention at school. Set a bedtime that allows for enough sleep and encourage your child to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Keep TVs and all digital devices out of your child's bedroom. Physical activity. Kids this age should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set daily limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By 12 years, it's common for many kids to: Show some signs of puberty:

  • In girls, puberty usually starts when they're between 8 and 13 with breast development and the appearance of pubic hair. Menstruation usually follows about 2 years after breast development begins.
  • In boys, testicular enlargement is the first sign of puberty. It happens around age 11, but may start as early as 9 years and as late as 15. Penile lengthening and the appearance of pubic hair follow.
  • have oily skin and/or acne
  • not always connect their actions with future consequences
  • want to be independent and fit in with peers
  • focus on personal appearance and behavior (they think all eyes are on them)
  • want to engage in risky behaviors
  • After talking with you, the doctor may request some time alone with your child to answer any additional questions.
4. Do a physical exam. This will include looking at the skin, listening to the heart and lungs, examining the back for any curvature of the spine, and checking for the signs of puberty. A parent, caregiver, or chaperone should be present during this part of the exam, but siblings should remain outside in the waiting room to give your child privacy. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect kids from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your child get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your child's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, and tuberculosis and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your child's next checkup at 13 years: School
  • Encourage your child to participate in a variety of activities, including music, arts and crafts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your child struggles.
  • Provide a quiet place to do homework. Minimize distractions, such as TV and cell phones.
  • As schoolwork gets harder, your child may struggle academically. If this happens, work with the school staff to determine the cause, such a learning or attention problem, bullying, or other stressors.
  • Peer pressure can lead to risky behaviors, such as drinking or smoking. Know who your kids are spending time with and make sure that an adult is monitoring them.
Self
  • Spend time with your child every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your child.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking. Praise good choices.
  • Be prepared to answer questions about puberty and the feelings associated with those changes. Be open to questions about gender identity and sexuality. Encourage your child to bring questions or concerns to you.
  • In girls, the first menstrual period (menarche) usually happens by age 13, but it can come as late as age 15. Talk to your daughter about menstruation before menarche occurs and encourage her to come to you once it does.
  • Encourage your child to wait until he or she is older to engage in sexual activity with others. Explain the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unwanted pregnancy.
  • Encourage your child to bathe or shower daily. If body odor is a concern, have your child use a deodorant.
  • Make sure your child brushes his or her teeth twice daily, flosses once a day, and sees a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Look for signs of depression, which can include irritability, sadness, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide.
Safety
  • Talk to your child about the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs.
  • Preteens should continue to ride in the back seat and always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • Make sure your child wears a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter.
  • Your child should apply sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher at least 15 minutes before going outside and reapply about every 2 hours
  • Protect your child from secondhand smoke and secondhand vapor from e-cigarettes.
  • Monitor your child's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your child is doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your child has visited.
  • Talk to your child about online safety, cyberbulling, and appropriate use of social media.
  • Protect your child from gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your child? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




13 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your teen's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your teen's blood pressure and possibly hearing. 3. Give a screening test to check for signs of depression. 4. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your teen's: Eating. Tens should begin making healthy food choices on their own. Explain that eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day and avoiding sweet, salty, and fatty foods not only is better nutritionally but will support a healthy weight. Calcium and iron are important for the growth spurts of adolescence. Aim for three daily servings of low-fat dairy products (or dairy alternatives) to provide 1,300 milligrams of calcium. Include enough lean meats, poultry, and seafood in the diet to reach 8 milligrams of iron per day. Sleeping. Teens need about 9 to 11 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep is common and can hurt grades and athletic performance. Biological changes make teens want to stay up later, but early school start times can make it hard for them to get enough sleep. Encourage your child to follow a relaxing bedtime routine, and keep TVs and all digital devices out of your teen's bedroom. Physical activity. Aim for 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set daily limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By age 13, it's common for teens to: show signs of puberty:

  • In boys, testicular enlargement is the first sign of puberty, followed by penile lengthening and the growth of pubic hair.
  • In girls, breasts development and pubic hair grows. About 2 years later, the first menstrual period comes.
  • have oily skin and/or acne
  • not always connect their actions with future consequences
  • want to be independent and fit in with peers
  • focus on personal appearance and behavior
  • want to engage in risky behaviors
5. Do a physical exam. This will include looking at the skin, listening to the heart and lungs, checking the back for any curvature of the spine, and looking for puberty development. A parent, caregiver, or chaperone should be present during this part of the exam, but siblings should remain outside in the waiting room to give your teen privacy. 6. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important that your teen get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 7. Order tests. Your doctor may check your teen's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your teen's next checkup at 14 years: School
  • Encourage your teen to participate in a variety of activities, such as music, arts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your teen struggles.
  • Provide a quiet place to do homework. Minimize distractions, such as TV and digital devices.
  • As schoolwork gets harder, your teen may struggle academically. If this happens, work with the school staff to determine the cause, such a learning or attention problem, bullying, or other stressors.
  • Peer pressure can lead to risky behaviors, such as drinking or smoking. Know who your kids are spending time with and make sure that an adult is monitoring them.
Self
  • Spend time with your teen every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your teen.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking. Praise good choices.
  • Be prepared to answer questions about puberty and the feelings associated with those changes. Be open to questions about gender identity and sexuality. Ask your teen to come to you with questions.
  • Encourage your teen to wait until he or she is older to engage in sexual activity with others. Explain the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unwanted pregnancy.
  • Encourage your teen to bathe or shower daily and start to use a deodorant.
  • Teens should brush teeth twice daily, floss once a day, and see a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Look for signs of depression, which can include irritability, sadness, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide.
Safety
  • Talk to your teen about the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs.
  • Teens should always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle. Tell your teen to never get into a car with a driver who has been drinking or doing drugs. Instead, let your teen know to always call you for help.
  • Remind your teen to wear a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter.
  • Teens should apply sunscreen of SPF 30 at least 15 minutes before going outside and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Monitor your teen's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your teen is doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your teen has visited.
  • Talk to your teen about online safety, cyberbullying, and using social media wisely.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your teen? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




14 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your teen's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your teen's blood pressure and possibly hearing. 3. Give a screening test to check for signs of depression. 4. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your teen's: Eating. Teens should begin making healthy food choices on their own. Explain that eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day and avoiding sweet, salty, and fatty foods not only is better nutritionally but will support a healthy weight. Calcium and iron are important for the growth spurts of adolescence. Aim for three daily servings of low-fat dairy products (or dairy alternatives) to provide 1,300 milligrams of calcium. Include enough lean meats, poultry, and seafood in the diet to reach 8 milligrams of iron per day. Sleeping. Teens need about 9 to 11 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep is common and can hurt grades and athletic performance. Biological changes make teens want to stay up later, but early school start times can make it hard for them to get enough sleep. Encourage your child to follow a relaxing bedtime routine, and keep TVs and all digital devices out of your teen's bedroom. Physical activity. Aim for 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Set daily limits on screen time, including TV, DVDs, video games, smartphones, tablets, and computers. Growth and development. By age 14, it's common for teens to: show signs of puberty:

  • In boys, testicular enlargement is the first sign of puberty, followed by penile lengthening and the growth of pubic hair.
  • In girls, breasts development and pubic hair grows. About 2 years later, the first menstrual period comes.
  • have oily skin and/or acne
  • not always connect their actions with future consequences
  • want to be independent and fit in with peers
  • focus on personal appearance and behavior
  • want to engage in risky behaviors
5. Do a physical exam. This will include looking at the skin, listening to the heart and lungs, checking the back for any curvature of the spine, and looking for puberty development. A parent, caregiver, or chaperone should be present during this part of the exam, but siblings should remain outside in the waiting room to give your teen privacy. 6. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important that your teen get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 7. Order tests. Your doctor may check your teen's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your teen's next checkup at 15 years: School
  • Encourage your teen to participate in a variety of activities, such as music, arts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your teen struggles.
  • Provide a quiet place to do homework. Minimize distractions, such as TV and digital devices.
  • As schoolwork gets harder, your teen may struggle academically. If this happens, work with the school staff to determine the cause, such a learning or attention problem, bullying, or other stressors.
  • Peer pressure can lead to risky behaviors, such as drinking or smoking. Know who your kids are spending time with and make sure that an adult is monitoring them.
Self
  • Spend time with your teen every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your teen.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking. Praise good choices.
  • Be prepared to answer questions about puberty and the feelings associated with those changes. Be open to questions about gender identity and sexuality. Ask your teen to come to you with questions.
  • Encourage your teen to wait until he or she is older to engage in sexual activity with others. Explain the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unwanted pregnancy.
  • Encourage your teen to bathe or shower daily and start to use a deodorant.
  • Teens should brush teeth twice daily, floss once a day, and see a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Look for signs of depression, which can include irritability, sadness, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide.
Safety
  • Talk to your teen about the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs.
  • Teens should always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle. Tell your teen to never get into a car with a driver who has been drinking or doing drugs. Instead, let your teen know to always call you for help.
  • Remind your teen to wear a helmet while riding a bike, skateboard, or scooter.
  • Teens should apply sunscreen of SPF 30 at least 15 minutes before going outside and reapply about every 2 hours.
  • Monitor your teen's Internet usage. Keep the family computer in a place where you can watch what your teen is doing. Install safety filters and check the browser history to see what websites your teen has visited.
  • Talk to your teen about online safety, cyberbullying, and using social media wisely.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your teen? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




15 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your teen's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your teen's blood pressure, vision, and possibly hearing. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your teen's: Eating. Teens should eat three meals a day that include lean protein, whole grains, at least five servings of fruits and vegetables, and three servings of low-fat or nonfat dairy products or milk alternatives. Sleeping. Teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep is common during the teen years and can hurt school and athletic performance. Biological changes make teens want to stay up later, but early school start times can make it hard for them to get enough sleep. Encourage your teen to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Digital devices, like phones and computers, should be turned off before bed. Physical activity. Teens should aim for 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Encourage your teen to limit screen time to no more than 2 hours daily, not including time spent on homework. Set a good example by limiting your own screen time and exercising daily. Growth and development. By age 15, it's common for teens to:

  • if female, have gotten their first period by now. If your daughter hasn't, talk to your doctor.
  • if male, to show signs of pubertal development, including testicular enlargement, penile lengthening, and the growth of pubic hair
  • be influenced by their peer group
  • explore different identities to help them find where they fit in
  • have sexual feelings. This includes an interest in dating and relationships, exploring one's sexuality, and becoming aware of sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • begin to think abstractly and reflect on how to make decisions, but still be impulse-driven and not think about the consequences of their actions
  • want to engage in risky behaviors
4. Do a physical exam. The doctor will look at the skin, listen to the heart and lungs, check the back for curvature of the spine, and check for puberty development. A chaperone should be present during the exam. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important that your teen receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your teen's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your teen's next checkup at 16 years: School
  • Encourage your teen to participate in a variety of activities, such as music, arts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Encourage your teen to take responsibility for schoolwork. Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your teen struggles.
  • Talk about future college or work plans. If your teen is having trouble in school, find out if bullying, depression, or learning or attention problems are to blame.
Self
  • Spend time with your teen every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your teen.
  • Praise good choices and include your teen in decision-making.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking.
  • Encourage your teen to wait until he or she is older to engage in sexual activity with others. Explain the risk of STDs and unwanted pregnancy. If he or she is sexually active, discuss the importance of birth control and condom use.
  • Your teen should brush his or her teeth twice daily, floss once a day, and see a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Explain to your teen the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs. Talk about prescription drug misuse. Praise your teen for abstaining from these activities.
  • Look for signs of depression, which can include irritability, depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide.
  • Encourage your teen to take charge of medical care by learning to schedule doctor's appointments, order prescriptions, and care for any ongoing health problems.
Safety
  • Teens should always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • As your teen starts driving, set limits for the number of passengers allowed and what hours he or she may drive. Explain the dangers of texting and other device use while driving.
  • Talk about the dangers of drinking and driving and tell your teen to never get in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs. Instead, let your teen know to always call you for help.
  • Make sure your teen knows about online safety, cyberbullying, and the wise use of social media.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




16 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your teen's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your teen's blood pressure, vision, and possibly hearing. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your teen's: Eating. Teens should eat three meals a day that include lean protein, whole grains, at least five servings of fruits and vegetables, and three servings of low-fat or nonfat dairy products or milk alternative. Sleeping. Teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep is common during the teen years and can hurt school and athletic performance. Biological changes make teens want to stay up later, but early school start times can make it hard for them to get enough sleep. Encourage your teen to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Digital devices, like phones and computers, should be turned off before bed. Physical activity. Teens should aim for 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Encourage your teen to limit his or her screen time to no more than 2 hours daily, not including time spent on homework. Set a good example by limiting your own screen time and exercising daily. Growth and development. By age 16, it's common for teens to:

  • if female, have gotten a first period by now. If your daughter hasn't, talk to your doctor.
  • if male, to show signs of pubertal development, including testicular enlargement, penile lengthening, and the growth of pubic hair
  • be influenced by their peer group
  • explore different identities to help them determine where they fit in
  • have sexual feelings. This includes an interest in dating and relationships, exploring one's sexuality, and becoming aware of sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • begin to think abstractly and reflect on how to make decisions, but still be impulse-driven and not think about the consequences of their actions
  • want to engage in risky behaviors
4. Do a physical exam. The doctor will look at the skin, listen to the heart and lungs, check the back for curvature of the spine, and check for puberty development. A chaperone should be present during the exam. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important that your teen get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your teen's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your teen's next checkup at 17 years: School
  • Encourage your teen to participate in a variety of activities, such as music, arts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Encourage your teen to take responsibility for schoolwork. Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your teen struggles.
  • Talk about future college or work plans. If your teen is having trouble in school, find out if bullying, depression, learning or attention problems are to blame.
Self
  • Spend time with your teen every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your teen.
  • Praise good choices, and include your teen in decision-making.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking.
  • Encourage your teen to wait until he or she is older to engage in sexual activity with others. Explain the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and unwanted pregnancy. Discuss the importance of birth control and condom use.
  • Your teen should brush his or her teeth twice daily, floss once a day, and see a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Explain to your teen the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs. Talk about prescription drug misuse. Praise your teen for abstaining from these activities.
  • Look for signs of depression, which can include irritability, depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide.
  • Encourage your teen to take charge of medical care by learning to chedule doctor's appointments, order prescriptions, and care for any ongoing health problems.
Safety
  • Teens should always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • As your teen starts driving, set limits for the number of passengers allowed and what hours he or she may drive. Explain the dangers of texting and other device use while driving.
  • Talk about the dangers of drinking and driving and tell your teen to never get in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs. Instead, let your teen know to always call you for help.
  • Make sure your teen knows about online safety, cyberbullying, and wise use of social media.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




17 years old


What to Expect During This Visit Your doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your teen's weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check your teen's blood pressure, vision, and possibly hearing. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about your teen's: Eating. Teens should eat three meals a day that include lean protein, whole grains, at least five servings of fruits and vegetables, and three servings of low-fat or nonfat dairy products or milk alternatives. Sleeping. Teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep is common during the teen years and can hurt school and athletic performance. Biological changes make teens want to stay up later, but early school start times can make it hard for them to get enough sleep. Encourage your teen to follow a relaxing bedtime routine. Digital devices, like phones and computers, should be turned off before bed. Physical activity. Teens should aim for 60 minutes of physical activity per day. Encourage your teen to limit his or her screen time to no more than 2 hours daily, not including time spent on homework. Set a good example by limiting your own screen time and exercising daily. Growth and development. By age 17, it's common for teens to:

  • if female, have gotten a first period by now. If your daughter hasn't, talk to your doctor.
  • if male, to show signs of pubertal development, including testicular enlargement, penile lengthening, and the growth of pubic hair
  • be influenced by their peer group
  • explore different identities to help them find where they fit in
  • have sexual feelings. This includes an interest in dating and relationships, exploring one's sexuality, and becoming aware of sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • begin to think abstractly and reflect on how to make decisions, but still be impulse-driven and not think about the consequences of their actions
  • want to engage in risky behaviors
4. Do a physical exam. The doctor will look at the skin, listen to the heart and lungs, check the back for curvature of the spine, and check for puberty development. A chaperone should be present during the exam. 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important that your teen receive them on time. Immunization schedules can vary from office to office, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may assess your teen's risk for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your teen's next checkup at 18 years: School
  • Encourage your teen to participate in a variety of activities, such as music, arts, sports, after-school clubs, and other activities of interest.
  • Encourage your teen to take responsibility for schoolwork. Praise accomplishments and provide support in areas where your teen struggles.
  • Talk about future college or work plans. If your teen is having trouble in school, find out if bullying, depression, or learning or attention problems are to blame.
Self
  • Spend time with your teen every day. Share mealtimes, be active together, and talk about things that are important to your teen.
  • Praise good choices and include your teen in decision-making.
  • Set rules and explain your expectations. Have fair consequences for rule-breaking.
  • Encourage your teen to wait until he or she is older to engage in sexual activity with others. Explain the risk of STDs and unwanted pregnancy. Discuss the importance of birth control and condom use.
  • Your teen should brush his or her teeth twice daily, floss once a day, and see a dentist once every 6 months.
  • Explain to your teen the dangers of smoking, vaping, alcohol, and drugs. Talk about prescription drug misuse. Praise your teen for abstaining from these activities.
  • Look for signs of depression, which can include irritability, depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide.
  • Encourage your teen to take charge of medical care by learning to schedule doctor's appointments, order prescriptions, and care for any ongoing health problems.
Safety
  • Teens should always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • As your teen starts driving, set limits for the number of passengers allowed and what hours he or she may drive. Explain the dangers of texting and other device use while driving.
  • Talk about the dangers of drinking and driving and tell your teen to never get in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs. Instead, let your teen know to always call you for help.
  • Make sure your teen knows about online safety, cyberbullying, and the wise use of social media.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately. Make sure kids cannot access the keys.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation. Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




18 years old


What to Expect During This Visit The doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check blood pressure, vision, and possibly hearing. 3. Give a screening (test) that checks for depression. 4. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about: Eating. Young adults should eat three meals a day that include lean protein, at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and at least three servings of dairy products or a fortified milk alternative. Limit food and drinks that are high in fat and sugar. Sleeping. Young adults need about 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep makes them less alert and cause problems at work or school. Follow a relaxing bedtime routine and turn off devices, including phones and computers, before bed. Physical activity. Each week, young adults should aim for 150 minutes of moderate physical activity (like fast walking) or 75 minutes of vigorous activity (like running). Growth and development. By 18, it's common for young adults to:

  • develop a sense of self
  • value individual relationships over peer groups
  • become more independent from parents
  • think abstractly to solve problems
  • have long-term plans for the future
5. Do a physical exam. The doctor will look at the skin and listen to the heart and lungs. Young women will undergo a pelvic exam or be referred to a gynecologist. In guys, the doctor will check the testicles for masses and varicocele (swollen veins). 6. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important to get them on time. Immunization schedules vary from office to office, so talk to the doctor about what to expect. 7. Order tests. Your doctor may check for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things young adults should keep in mind until their next checkup: Self
  • Make plans for the future, which may include college and/or work.
  • Continue to pursue areas of interest, including art, music, exercise, and community service.
  • Take responsibility for school and work. Lean on family members, a health care professional, or other trusted adult for support in areas where you may struggle.
  • Learn strategies for coping with stress, such as exercise, meditation, or talking to friends and family.
  • Be aware of signs of depression, which can include irritability, depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide. Get professional help if you're depressed.
  • Make plans to switch to an adult doctor.
  • Brush teeth with fluoride toothpaste and floss daily. See a dentist twice a year.
Safety
  • Always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • Don't text or use cellphones while driving.
  • If you're sexually active, use birth control and condoms to protect against unwanted pregnancy and STDs.
  • Avoid smoking, vaping, drinking alcohol, and using drugs. Don't use prescription medicines that weren't prescribed for you.
  • Don't drink and drive. Never get in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs. Instead, make plans with a designated driver or call for a ride.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation.Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? You doctor can point you toward community resources or refer you to a social worker who can help.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




19 years old


What to Expect During This Visit The doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check blood pressure, vision, and possibly hearing. 3. Give a screening (test) that checks for depression. 3. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about: Eating. Young adults should eat three meals a day that include lean protein, at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and at least three servings of dairy products or a fortified milk alternative. Limit food and drinks that are high in fat and sugar. Sleeping. Young adults need about 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep makes them less alert and cause problems at work or school. Follow a relaxing bedtime routine and turn off devices, including phones and computers, before bed. Physical activity. Each week, young adults should aim for 150 minutes of moderate physical activity (like fast walking) or 75 minutes of vigorous activity (like running). Growth and development. By 19, it's common for young adults to:

  • develop a sense of self
  • value individual relationships over peer groups
  • become more independent from parents
  • think abstractly to solve problems
  • have long-term plans for the future
4. Do a physical exam. The doctor will look at the skin and listen to the heart and lungs. Young women will undergo a pelvic exam or be referred to a gynecologist. In guys, the doctor will check the testicles for masses and varicocele (swollen veins). 5. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important to get them on time. Immunization schedules vary from office to office, so talk to the doctor about what to expect. 6. Order tests. Your doctor may check for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things young adults should keep in mind until their next checkup: Self
  • Make plans for the future, which may include college and/or work.
  • Continue to pursue areas of interest, including art, music, exercise, and community service.
  • Take responsibility for school and work. Lean on family members, a health care professional, or other trusted adult for support in areas where you may struggle.
  • Learn strategies for coping with stress, such as exercise, meditation, or talking to friends and family.
  • Be aware of signs of depression, which can include irritability, depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide. Get professional help if you're depressed.
  • Make plans to switch to an adult doctor.
  • Brush teeth with fluoride toothpaste and floss daily. See a dentist twice a year.
Safety
  • Always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • Don't text or use cellhones while driving.
  • If you're sexually active, use birth control and condoms to protect against unwanted pregnancy and STDs.
  • Avoid smoking, vaping, drinking alcohol, and using drugs. Don't use prescription medicines that weren't prescribed for you.
  • Don't drink and drive. Never get in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs. Instead, make plans with a designated driver or call for a ride.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation.Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? You doctor can point you toward community resources or refer you to a social worker who can help.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




20 years old


What to Expect During This Visit The doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check blood pressure, vision, and possibly hearing. 3. Give a screening (test) that checks for depression. 4. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about: Eating. Young adults should eat three meals a day that include lean protein, at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and at least three servings of dairy products or a fortified milk alternative. Limit food and drinks that are high in fat and sugar. Sleeping. Young adults need about 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep makes them less alert and cause problems at work or school. Follow a relaxing bedtime routine and turn off devices, including phones and computers, before bed. Physical activity. Each week, young adults should aim for 150 minutes of moderate physical activity (like fast walking) or 75 minutes of vigorous activity (like running). Growth and development. By 20, it's common for young adults to:

  • develop a sense of self
  • value individual relationships over peer groups
  • become more independent from parents
  • think abstractly to solve problems
  • have long-term plans for the future
5. Do a physical exam. The doctor will look at the skin and listen to the heart and lungs. Young women will undergo a pelvic exam or be referred to a gynecologist. In guys, the doctor will check the testicles for masses and varicocele (swollen veins). 6. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important to get them on time. Immunization schedules vary from office to office, so talk to the doctor about what to expect. 7. Order tests. Your doctor may check for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things young adults should keep in mind until their next checkup: Self
  • Make plans for the future, which may include college and/or work.
  • Continue to pursue areas of interest, including art, music, exercise, and community service.
  • Take responsibility for school and work. Lean on family members, a health care professional, or other trusted adult for support in areas where you may struggle.
  • Learn strategies for coping with stress, such as exercise, meditation, or talking to friends and family.
  • Be aware of signs of depression, which can include irritability, depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide. Get professional help if you're depressed.
  • Make plans to switch to an adult doctor.
  • Brush teeth with fluoride toothpaste and floss daily. See a dentist twice a year.
Safety
  • Always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • Don't text or use cellphones while driving.
  • If you're sexually active, use birth control and condoms to protect against unwanted pregnancy and STDs.
  • Avoid smoking, vaping, drinking alcohol, and using drugs. Don't use prescription medicines that weren't prescribed for you.
  • Don't drink and drive. Never get in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs. Instead, make plans with a designated driver or call for a ride.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation.Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? You doctor can point you toward community resources or refer you to a social worker who can help.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




21 years old


What to Expect During This Visit The doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check weight and height, calculate body mass index (BMI), and plot the measurements on growth charts. 2. Check blood pressure, vision, and possibly hearing. 3. Give a screening (test) that checks for depression. 4. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about: Eating. Young adults should eat three meals a day that include lean protein, at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and at least three servings of dairy products or a fortified milk alternative. Limit food and drinks that are high in fat and sugar. Sleeping. Young adults need about 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. Poor sleep makes them less alert and cause problems at work or school. Follow a relaxing bedtime routine and turn off devices, including phones and computers, before bed. Physical activity. Each week, young adults should aim for 150 minutes of moderate physical activity (like fast walking) or 75 minutes of vigorous activity (like running). Growth and development. By 21, it's common for young adults to:

  • develop a sense of self
  • value individual relationships over peer groups
  • become more independent from parents
  • think abstractly to solve problems
  • have long-term plans for the future
5. Do a physical exam. The doctor will look at the skin and listen to the heart and lungs. Young women will undergo a pelvic exam or be referred to a gynecologist. In guys, the doctor will check the testicles for masses and varicocele (swollen veins). 6. Update immunizations. Immunizations can protect people from serious illnesses, so it's important to get them on time. Immunization schedules vary from office to office, so talk to the doctor about what to expect. 7. Order tests. Your doctor may check for anemia, high cholesterol, tuberculosis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and order tests, if needed. Looking Ahead Here are some things young adults should keep in mind: Self
  • Make plans for the future, which may include college and/or work.
  • Continue to pursue areas of interest, including art, music, exercise, and community service.
  • Take responsibility for school and work. Lean on family members, a health care professional, or other trusted adult for support in areas where you may struggle.
  • Learn strategies for coping with stress, such as exercise, meditation, or talking to friends and family.
  • Be aware of signs of depression, which can include irritability, depressed mood, loss of interest in activities, poor academic performance, and talk of suicide. Get professional help if you're depressed.
  • Make plans to switch to an adult doctor.
  • Brush teeth with fluoride toothpaste and floss daily. See a dentist twice a year.
Safety
  • Always wear a seatbelt while in a vehicle.
  • Don't text or use cellphones while driving.
  • If you're sexually active, use birth control and condoms to protect against unwanted pregnancy and STDs.
  • Avoid smoking, vaping, drinking alcohol, and using drugs. Don't use prescription medicines that weren't prescribed for you.
  • Don't drink and drive. Never get in a car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs. Instead, make plans with a designated driver or call for a ride.
  • Prevent gun injuries by not keeping a gun in the home. If you do have a gun, keep it unloaded and locked away. Ammunition should be locked up separately.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're concerned about your living situation.Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? You doctor can point you toward community resources or refer you to a social worker who can help.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.




New Born


What to Expect In the hospital, the doctor and/or nurse will probably: 1. Check your baby's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on the growth charts. 2. Ask questions, address any concerns, and offer advice on taking care of your baby: Feeding. Breast milk is the best form of nutrition for infants, but formula also can provide the nutrients they need. Newborns should be fed on demand (when they're hungry), which is about every 1 to 3 hours. Your doctor or nurse may watch as you breastfeed and offer help with any problems. Formula-fed newborns take about 1–1½ ounces (30–45 ml) at each feeding. Burp your baby midway through a feeding and at the end. As they grow, babies start to eat more at each feeding, so will need fewer feedings over time. Peeing and pooping. A breastfed baby may have only one or two wet diapers a day until the mother's milk comes in. Expect about six wet diapers by 3–5 days of age for all babies. Newborns may have just one poopy diaper a day at first. Poop is dark and tarry the first few days, then becomes soft or loose and greenish-yellow by about 3–4 days. Newborns typically have several poopy diapers a day if breastfed and fewer if formula-fed. Sleeping. A newborn may sleep up to 18 or 19 hours a day, waking up often (day and night) to breastfeed or take a bottle. Breastfed babies usually wake to eat every 1 to 3 hours, while formula-fed babies may sleep longer, waking every 2 to 4 hours to eat (formula takes longer to digest so babies feel fuller longer). Newborns should not sleep more than 4 hours between feedings until they have good weight gain, usually within the first few weeks. After that, it's OK if a baby sleeps for longer stretches. Developing. Newborn babies should: pay attention to faces or bright objects 8–12 inches (20–30 cm) away respond to sound — they may turn to a parent's voice, quiet down, blink, startle, or cry hold arms and legs in a flexed position have strong newborn reflexes, such as: rooting and sucking: turns toward, then sucks breast/bottle nipple grasp: tightly grabs hold of a finger placed within the palm fencer's pose: straightens arm when head is turned to that side and bends opposite arm Moro reflex (startle response): throws out arms and legs, then curls them in when startled 3. Do a physical exam with your baby undressed while you are present. This will include an eye exam, listening to your baby's heart; feeling pulses; inspecting the umbilical cord; and checking the back, hips, and feet. 4. Do screening tests. Your baby's heel will be pricked for a small amount of blood to test for certain harmful diseases. Your baby should also get a hearing test and oxygen levels checked before leaving the hospital. 5. Give first immunizations. While in the hospital, your baby should have his or her first immunizations. Immunizations can protect infants from serious childhood illnesses, so it's important that your baby get them on time. Immunization schedules can vary, so talk to your doctor about what to expect. Looking Ahead Here are some things to keep in mind until your baby's next routine checkup in a few days: Feeding If you breastfeed:

  • Help your baby latch on correctly: mouth opened wide, tongue down, with as much of the breast in the mouth as possible.
  • Don't use a bottle or pacifier until nursing is established (around 1 month).
  • Feed your baby when he or she is hungry. Pay attention to signs that your baby is full, such as turning away from the nipple and closing the mouth.
  • Continue to take a prenatal vitamin or multivitamin daily.
If you formula-feed:
  • Give your baby iron-fortified formula.
  • Follow the formula package's instructions when making and storing bottles.
  • Don't prop bottles or put your baby to bed with a bottle.
  • Pay attention to signs that your baby is full, such as turning away from the bottle and closing the mouth.
Routine Care
  • Wash your hands before handling the baby and avoid people who may be sick.
  • Hold your baby and be attentive to his or her needs. You can't spoil a newborn.
  • Keep the diaper below the umbilical cord so the stump can dry. The umbilical cord usually falls off in 10–14 days.
  • For circumcised boys, put petroleum jelly on the penis or diaper's front.
  • Girls may have vaginal discharge that may include a small amount of blood during the first week of life.
  • Give sponge baths until the umbilical cord falls off and a boy's circumcision heals. Make sure the water isn't too hot — test it with your wrist first.
  • Use fragrance-free soaps and lotions.
  • Call your baby's doctor if your infant has a fever, is acting sick, isn't eating, isn't peeing or pooping, isn't latching on or sucking well when nursing, doesn't seem satisfied after breastfeeding, looks yellow, or has increasing redness or pus around the umbilical cord or circumcision. Do not give any medicine without talking to the doctor first.
  • It's common for new moms to feel tired and overwhelmed at times. But if these feelings are intense, or you feel sad, moody, or anxious, call your doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor if you're worried about your living situation. Do you have the things that you need to take care of your baby? Do you have enough food, a safe place to live, and health insurance? Your doctor can tell you about community resources or refer you to a social worker.
Safety
  1. To reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS):

  • Breastfeed your baby.
  • Let your baby sleep in your room in a bassinet or crib next to the bed until your baby's first birthday, or for at least 6 months, when the risk of SIDS is highest.
  • Always place your baby to sleep on a firm mattress on his or her back in a crib or bassinet without any crib bumpers, blankets, quilts, pillows, or plush toys.
  • Avoid overheating by keeping the room temperature comfortable.
  • Don't overbundle your baby.
  • Consider putting your baby to sleep sucking on a pacifier. If you're breastfeeding, wait until breastfeeding is established before introducing the pacifier.
  1. Don't smoke or use e-cigarettes. Don't let anyone smoke or vape around your baby.
  2. Always put your baby in a rear-facing car seat in the back seat. Never leave your baby alone in a car.
  3. While your baby is awake, don't leave your little one unattended, especially on high surfaces or in the bath.
  4. Never shake your baby — it can cause bleeding in the brain and even death.
  5. Avoid sun exposure by keeping your baby covered and in the shade when possible. Sunscreens are not recommended for infants younger than 6 months. However, you may use a small amount of sunscreen on an infant younger than 6 months if shade and clothing don't offer enough protection.
These checkup sheets are consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)/Bright Futures guidelines.





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